The European Wine Crawl You Need To Experience

  • January 16, 2018

We’re giving wine lovers something to get excited about this year.  Ditch the generic European tour your amigas went on a few years back, because we’ve got a more interesting itinerary for you to try out. Cue ‘The European Wine Crawl’—a brief list of some of the must-see, must-try European wine regions that are sure to make your wine-loving heart do backflips over and over again.

Immerse yourself in internationally acclaimed wine regions that produce the world’s best, 24/7. Thank us later.

Campania, Italy

Campania-Italy-GettyImages-497208893_super

Let’s start our epic wine crawl at Campania, one of God’s greatest gifts to man—more specifically, wine lovers. Imagine gawking at a spectacular view of the Amalfi Coast decorated with pastel-hued towns such as Positano, Amalfi, and Ravello, all of which are enveloped within a lush expanse of cliffs and azure seas…whilst sipping on quite a full glass of Campania’s finest Aglianico red (wine made from the world’s oldest cultivated grape slash an Italian treasure slash one of Italy’s greatest contributions to the world save for pizza).

Or one of the triumvirates of Campania whites, whether that be…

Fiano (wine made from the almost extinct! finest! ancient era! white grapes you will ever taste), Greco di Tufo (wine made from grapes of Greek origin), or Falanghina (another ancient grape variety).

The permutations are endless at Campania, simply because they are head over heels in-love with wine (and luckily, so are you). Make sure to start your journey during the spring—not too cold, not too hot, not too touristy. Perfection.

Burgundy, France

Burgundy-France-GettyImages-98134806_high

In the mere span of 6 days, one can already traverse every crevice of  Burgundy. Do not underestimate this humble region, for within its depths are large expanses of storied vineyards that can put all other vineyards to shame. Home to the world’s best and most expensive pinot noirs and chardonnays, Burgundy’s beauty is rooted from its quaintness, charm, and friendly people. There will always be a seat at the table for you here, where you can enjoy a quick glass of some of the world’s finest wines with the ones you hold near and dear to you. Add to that the fact that each glass is ambiguous in nature; vineyard ownership across the region is pretty complex, making each bottle of wine mysterious yet charming in nature.

Bordeaux, France

bordeaux-france-2

Bordeaux is one of the greatest cities in France. Big words, we know. Not only is this lovely metropolis home to some of the loveliest views France has to offer (please see Gothic Cathédrale Saint-André, Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux, the Place de la Bourse, the Miroir d’Eau reflecting pool, Garonne…), but it is also the wine capital of the world. Nobody loves wine as much as Bordeaux does, and while most will bravely raise counterarguments, we stand our ground on this one. Here’s why:

Case and point one, it houses the Cité du Vin: a grandiose wine museum that trumps international competition. Gaze at a spectacular collection of over 800 different wines and experience 3 state-of-the-art tasting rooms.

Case and point two, Bordeaux is also home to Vinexpo, the world’s largest wine fair that is held once every two years.

Arrive as a tourist, leave as a sommelier.

La Rioja, Spain

ruta-del-vino

It’s not so difficult to do a wine crawl in a country that consumes wine like water. After all, Spain is a grape-making machine. Handpicking the best wine region here was quite a challenge, however after much research and careful consideration, we have decided that La Rioja tops the list (and a lot will agree with us on this one). Located north of the country with Logroño as its capital, La Rioja is known worldwide as the oldest winemaking region in the whole of Spain. 1,000 years old, we feel, is a pretty credible amount of time to master the art, don’t you think?

Best known for its blends with notes of vanilla—particularly Tempranillo and Viura—Rioja wines go through the long, meticulous process of aging, spending lifetimes in tons of oak barrels. Who knew that such an unassuming little province north of Spain could actually earn Goliath status in the wine industry?

by Samantha Masigan